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Partners:- Mr Ewing G. Walker B.V.M.&S. Cert SAS M.R.C.V.S. Mr Neil R. Walmlsley M.V.B. M.R.C.V.S

Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk
Home. Small Animals. Special Offers. Orthopaedics. Ophthalmology. Equine. Contact & About us.
book appointment Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk

We offer


Clinics


       Orthopaedic & Ophthalmology Referrals

• A Caring approach to you and your animals

• Dedicated team of qualified, experienced vets and nurses

• Full diagnostic techniques

• Advanced small animal surgical facilities

• Emergency vet service covering Portadown, Armagh, Richhill, Craigavon, Lurgan


Greenmount Veterinary Clinic

72 Gilford Road, Portadown, Co Armagh Northern Ireland

BT63 5EG Tel:02838352640/ 02838358525

&

12 Maynooth Road Richhill, Co Armagh, Northern Ireland

BT61 9QE

Tel: 028 38 872002


Our orthopaedic referral site can be reached at www.vetortho.co.uk. The vetortho site is directed towards other Veterinary practices in Ireland who refer cases for surgery to our clinic in Portadown. Our orthopaedic procedures are performed by Ewing Walker, one of the Partners, who has achieved by examination the RCVS Certificate in Small Animal Surgery.

Advanced Eye surgery is performed onsite including cataract surgery for dogs and treatment of other eye problems in cats and dogs.


Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk

Small Animals & pet care

Equine Practice

Patient care

Orthopaedic Referrals

Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk





























Greenmount Veterinary Clinic, Portadown & Richhill , Northern Ireland, Specialising in Small Animal and Equine Practice.  

Greenmount Veterinary Clinic specialises in small animal and equine practice and is based in Portadown & Richhill, Co Armagh, Northern Ireland.

This allows us to focus our energy and time on these two areas in order to provide a more specialist service in terms of training , facilities and equipment available.

This website is divided into the two main areas of Small animals (pets) and Equine practice.

Please take time to navigate around the site using the links on the left.

Information is available on medical and surgical facilities and also preventative healthcare.

This site is intended as general advice and information for clients of the practice.

A specialist orthopaedic referral site can be reached at www.vetortho.co.uk. The vetortho site is directed towards referring veterinary surgeons and contains pictures of a more surgical nature.

 Greenmount Veterinary Clinic vet clinic specialising in small animal pets dogs cats and equine horse practice in Portadown co Armagh northern ireland bt with specialist orthopaedic orthopaedic facilities for fractured broken bones fracture repair joint surgery. Osteochrondrosis ocd by arthroscopy arthroscopic surgery key hole surgery by endoscopy endoscope. Elbow dysplasia disease for fragmented coronoid process fcp and ununited anconeal process in german shepherd dogs GSD Alsatian dogs. Shoulder Osteochrondrosis ocd in large breeds of dogs 6 months old. Spinal surgery for prolapsed disc disease in lumbar back slipped disc and cervical neck spine. Hansen type disk disease treated by hemi laminectomy or ventral slot surgery in dogs. Caudal cervical spondylomyolopathy or wobbler syndrome disease in dalmation dogs and great dane dogs is similar to lumbar lumbosacral disease in dogs with disc prolapse and vertebral malformation and tipping causing spinal cord compression and paralysis and urinary incontinence and ataxia of the hind limbs or back legs. Broken bones or fractured legs are repaired using plates and screws pinning pins and external skeletal fixators fixation ESF stainless steel methods of surgery. Road traffic accidents in dogs cause shock with broken bones. The full range of orthopaedic equipment has been purchased to permit varied Fracture repair techniques, Arthroscopy, Joint surgery and Spinal surgery to be undertaken. External fixators; AO/ASIF plating and salter/harris growth plate separations. Arthroscopy, Osteochrondrosis/OCD, Articular fractures; Cruciate Surgery, Luxations-patellae, hip, elbow, hock; Ligament injuries, arthrodesis. Triple pelvic osteotomy for hip dysplasia in dogs canine hip dysplasia is a chronic disease. Spinal contrast myelogram radiographs to locate site of spinal compression. Surgery for Disc prolapse Ventral slot; hemi laminectomy; and Caudal cervical spondylopathy ("wobblers") Lumbosacral disease. Lameness investigations/ case workups. Portadown's out of city, central N.I. location and convenience to M1 motorway makes for a shorter and easier journey for your client and their pet which may have multiple trauma. Client Affordability As always it is ideal when a client's pet is insured but many are not. We offer an affordable orthopaedic referral service without sacrifice of quality. Your client Loyalty. Our emphasis is on working with the referring vet ensuring early return of client & patient to their own practice post op. Quality of service. Cases for referral are treated as a priority and seen immediately. Variety of practical orthopaedic courses attended over the years: Fracture repair AO/ASIF plating Glasgow University Fracture repair- External fixators Glasgow University Joint fractures & Joint disease Liverpool University Joint surgery- hips & stifles Glasgow University Joint surgery- elbows, hocks & carpus Glasgow University Spinal surgery- disc disease Liverpool University Practical small animal orthopaedics NI Hamish Denny Spinal surgery NI Hamish Denny Arthroscopic Surgery Liverpool University Orthopaedic skills course Dublin University Spinal surgery fractures, lumbosacral disease, Liverpool University. Member of British Veterinary Orthopaedic Association.

Arthroscopy has long been the gold standard for investigation & surgery of human and equine joint disease due to the minimal disruption of joint structures and the more rapid return to function post surgery. There are many applications for arthroscopy in small animal surgery in particular for investigation of Osteochrondrosis/ OCD, elbow disease, meniscal injuries and shoulder bicepital tendon disease. We have found arthroscopy most useful to date in the investigation, diagnosis and treatment of fragmented coronoid process in elbow disease as this condition cannot be easily diagnosed from radiography until late in the disease when evidence of osteoarthritis has already occurred. This condition occurs frequently in Labradors, Golden Retrievers, Rottweilers and Newfoundlands and presents as a persistent sometimes bilateral foreleg lameness at 6-7 months old onwards. Minimally invasive arthroscopy gives a clear and extremely detailed picture of the cartilage surface and permits probing for fissures and flaps, allowing diagnosis and surgery to be performed before the onset of the destructive cycle of osteoarthritis. The earlier the diagnosis and treatment of OCD/FCP the better is the long term outcome. Due to the small skin incision and minimal periarticular trauma involved most dogs are weight bearing immediately after surgery with less post op complications than with standard open arthrotomy. 1.5cm cartilage flap removed from an OCD lesion on the medial humeral condyle of a 7 month old chocolate Labrador. Slipped disc or Intervertebral disc disease is the most common surgical neurological problem seen in small animal practice and varies in its presentation from back or neck pain through limb weakness, ataxia, recumbancy to complete paralysis of one or more limbs. Whilst pain and mild neurological symptoms can be treated with rest and non steroidals more advanced lesions require urgent investigation and surgery if the outcome is to be successful. Slipped disc Intervertebral disc disease cases with deep pain sensation have at least a 90% success rate in our clinic for return to function, however early referral cannot be over emphasised. This condition occurs frequently in Spaniels, Terriers, Dachshunds, Bassets, Labradors, Golden Retrievers, Rottweilers and GSDs. If deep pain sensation is absent success rates are much lower. In slipped disc disease deep pain sensation is always present when a dog is ataxic or can move a limb voluntarily. Following location of the disc lesion by myelography a Hemi-laminectomy is carried out for thoraco-lumbar disc lesions, whilst a ventral slot is performed in the neck with fenestration of adjacent discs if necessary. Caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy CCSM or “Wobbler” syndrome usually affects the C6-C7 region of the neck and is due to vertebral instability, hyperplasia of the soft tissue spinal structures, disc herniation and in some cases vertebral malformation. These lead to spinal cord compression causing hind leg ataxia and later foreleg involvement. CCSM occurs in older large breeds such as Dalmations, Dobermans, Rottweillers & Retreivers. Also young Great Danes. The surgery performed is either a standard ventral slot or in some cases fusion of the vertebrae in a distracted position by “screw & washer” placement or screws and bone cement. Lumbosacral disease is very similar in many ways to wobbler syndrome and can be treated with similar distraction fusion techniques. Fractures are repaired using a variety of techniques including plating, lag screws, pinning, external fixators and often a combination of these. Articular fractures bring additional considerations to the repair methods used. It is essential to re-establish the articular surface congruity otherwise severe DJD will develop quickly. The most common articular fractures we see are distal intercondylar humeral & femoral fractures in young animals or Spaniels & acetabular fractures. Dilsocated hip- Hip luxations which cannot be manually reduced are opened and maintained in position with an ilio-femoral suture. This technique is very successful in retaining the luxated hip in place and recurrence is very rare. Surgery for rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament is the most common reason for opening a joint. Most are treated using the lateral fabellar suture technique after correcting any meniscal tear injuries. Sulcoplasty for Medial patellar luxation. The angle of the tibial tuberosity is usually realigned to correct the direction of the pull of the patellar ligament. Most cases of elbow disease including fragmented coronoid process and osteochrondrosis are now treated by arthroscopic surgery. Ununited anconeal process is seen fairly commonly in German Shepherds and we have found that proximal ulnar ostectomy at 6-7 months old has lead to a reduction in lameness and a fusion of the UAP in most cases. Osteochrondrosis/ OCD of the shoulder and stifle can also be approached either by arthroscopy or as shown here by open arthrotomy and removal of the lap. Arthroscopic view of a fragmented coronoid in the elbow Ununited anconeal process in a young GSD elbow. Proximal ulnar ostectomy to relieve pressure on anconeus & encourage fusion. Hip dysplasia is a common cause of lameness in young large breed dogs. If detected early before the closure of the growth plates corrective surgery may be performed to improve the coverage of the femoral head by the acetabulum. This is usually done by a triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO) which for best results should be performed at 7-9 months of age and must be done before the onset of DJD or significant articular cartilage damage. The pelvis is cut in three places and a plate applied to the ilial osteotomy site to rotate the acetabulum between 20-40 degrees as needed. Some improvement is seen immediately in the post op radiographs however significant improvement is usually seen over the following 6 months as remodelling & growth occurs. If early corrective surgery is not performed, particularly in large breed dogs, which may also be overweight development of severe arthritis is likely. A femoral head & neck osteotomy may have to performed to reduce the pain. A total hip replacement may also be considered in large dogs. Bilateral Triple pelvic osteotomy with good acetabular coverage at a four year follow up radiograph. No evidence of DJD is visible in either hip. Severe bilateral hip dysplasia with development of advanced DJD in a dog which did not have a TPO. Femoral head & neck osteotomy for end stage hip dysplasia in a dog. The following guidance is most likely familiar reading for most veterinary surgeons, however it may be useful to have it convenient for reference when considering referral of orthopaedic cases. These notes are guidance on the likely common cases and obviously the less common causes have to be considered.

Foreleg lameness in young large breed dogs (labs, Retievers, Rottweillers, GSD, giant breeds). The most common site will be at the elbow with conditions such as fragmented coronoid process (FCP) and osteochrondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, elbow dysplasia and ununited anconeal process (UAP). The most useful radiograph is a flexed lateral view in which the anconeus is visible. AP view is also useful. FCP and osteochrondrosis are very difficult to diagnosis on radiograph in the early stages and some cases have no visible radiographic changes. Hence in a young large dog with elbow pain which is persisting for more than a few weeks after rest consider arthrotomy or better is arthroscopy for a diagnosis +/- treatment. This is best done early ie 6-8 months old. A diagnosis of UAP can only be made after 20 weeks old as the anconeus does not normally fuse until this time. After 25 weeks the diagnosis is definite, common in GSD, often bilateral. Shoulder pain can often be mistaken for elbow pain, because when the shoulder is extended the elbow extends also and it can be very difficult to distinguish between shoulder and elbow pain particularly in large active young dog. Hence if nothing is seen radiographically at the shoulder consider the elbow. Shoulder OCD is seen in large and giant dogs and can be treated arthroscopically. Hindleg lameness in young large breed dogs (labs, Retrievers, Rottweillers, GSD, giant breeds). The most common cause will be hip dysplasia with cases presenting from 6-9 months usually. Standard VD view usually gives a diagnosis and a laxity in the hip (ortolania sign) may be felt. Without surgery many cases will resolve at around 12 months old due to fibrosis and stabilisation of the subluxation however DJD and significant remodelling of the femoral neck and acetabulum will occur leading to DJD related pain later which cannot be reversed. If instead, cases are selected early and have surgery such as TPO to rotate the acetabulum and increase femoral head coverage whilst the dog is still growing (ie 6-9 months old ideally) DJD development can be significantly reduced or avoided. If surgery is performed at over 1 year old the outcome is not as good. Once DJD is present the surgery is not recommended. Consider medial patellar luxation in some breeds with straight hind legs eg Japanese Akitas or in association with hip dyspasia. Osteochrondrosis of the femoral condyle and hock are less common causes is this group. Hindleg lameness in young small breed dogs (JRT, Yorkshire terriers, toy breeds)The most common cause is patellar luxation. Usually it is medial luxation and either the patella can be luxated medially easily (grade 1-3) or else it is permantly fixed (grade 4). The dog often skips with the leg held up every few steps or may frequently extend in out backwards to help relocate the patella. Patellar luxation is often found incidently at first vaccination although we tend only to operate on those who are clinically lame and all grade 4 cases. Most cases require tibial transposition. Failure to carry out a transposition and correct the quadriceps-patellar-tibial aligment is the most common cause of failure or recurrance. Perthes disease of the hip causes avascular necrosis and acute pain. The only treatment option is femoral head and neck excision. This is best performed with an oscilating saw and not a gigi wire as the neck must also be removed. Leaving a spur on the neck will result in continued pain and require repeat surgery to remove.Fractures and trauma cases

Most cases present in shock and providing pain relief and i/v fluids are more important initially than assessment of fractures and radiography. Cases will benefit in terms of survival rates if this started before transporting. If a fracture is detected stabilisation of the fracture in a Robert Jones type soft bandage will provide support, reduce swelling, and make the patient more comfortable during transportion. This also helps to reduce the serious complication of a sharp bone fragment subsequently penetrating the skin. Open fractures cases or cases with wounds elsewhere on the leg which is fractured need careful attention. Fracture contamination in the clinic is a real risk and these cases should be handled using sterile technique wearing sterile gloves. The area may be clipped and lavaged with sterile saline, avoiding flushing material into the wound and a sterile bandage applied. Systemic antibiotics should be given rather than applying topical non sterile solutions to the open wound. Spinal cases Spinal cases present with symptoms relative to the degree of cord compression/ injury in order of severity : from mild back or neck pain, through ataxia +/- placing reflex deficits, to recumbancy with voluntary movements, to recumbancy with no voluntary movement +/- urinary/ faecal incontinence +/- loss of superficial pain sensation +/- loss of deep pain sensation. A general guide is seek early advice and or referral. This is a very basic guide to examining a suspect spinal case: If the dog is walking but ataxic test for placing reflexes: knuckle the paws over individually so the dorsal surface touches the ground and the dog should immediately return the foot to a normal position. Compare the legs with each other both front & back, and left and right.

With the dog standing place a piece of A4 paper under the foot and slide the paper and foot laterally– the dog should move the foot back to centre to maintain its balance. Compare each leg in turn. Palpate the spine for evidence of pain. Dogs with these mild symptoms should be assessed carefully as may progress rapidly to the following. If the dog is recumbent or unable to rise on the hindlegs support the dog in a standing position and test the placing reflexes as above. Observe for voluntary movements of the limbs, they may be very weak and seen when a familiar person comes to see the dog. If there is voluntary movement in a spinal case there will be deep pain sensation present. These cases need urgent investigation and surgery and usually have a good prognosis for return to function if dealt with quickly. If the dog is recumbent or unable to rise on the hind legs and no voluntary movements are present it is important to test for conscious pain sensation. The most important thing to assess is that the dog is consciously aware of the pain– ie it must turn its head to look at the stimulus or cry out or try to bite you. The most common mistake is that when a strong pain stimulus is given to the foot the leg will withdraw as a reflex– this is NOT evidence of conscious pain sensation– this actually occurs more strongly if the spinal cord is completely cut. Test for superficial pain sensation first– do this by gently squeezing the base of the nail with a pair of haemostats. In stoical dogs compare to another normal area to assess the dogs normal response to give an idea of the response to be expected. If conscious pain sensation is present there is no need to test for deep pain. If there is no response to superficial stimulus apply the haemostats to the bone and test more strongly. If either superficial or deep pain sensation is present in paralysed cases they need urgent investigation and surgery, and often have a good prognosis for return to function if dealt with quickly. If the dog is recumbent or unable to rise on the hindlegs, has no voluntary movements of the affected area and has no conscious response to deep pain sensation the prognosis is much poorer and most likely hopeless if present for >24-28hrs. Trauma cases require close monitoring under anaesthetic as they are often recovering from shock and may have pulmonary or myocardial contusions. Some fracture repairs and spinal operations can be take several hours and the ability to monitor vital signs and take action to correct variations in blood pressure or oxygenation etc can be beneficial. Parameters which are monitored under general anaesthetic include: Continous Electrocardiogram trace. Non invasive blood pressure Pulse oximetry spO2 Core body temperature rectal probe Respiratory rate. Minute volume. Tidal volume. Inspired oxygen concentration. Inspired isoflurane and nitrous oxide concentration. Capnography (end expired CO2 concentration). From M1 Motorway from Belfast. Travel along M1 motorway passing Lurgan/Craigavon turn off, and take off M1 at next junction for M12/ Portadown/craigavon/ Armagh. Go straight at the next motorway roundabout. Take the next slip road off on the left for Carn. At the roundabout take right past Prentice BMW garage. Go straight along this road through a set of lights to a mini roundabout. Take left at the roundabout onto Church Street. Go to the lights at the end of Church street and take right and then immediately left onto Bachelors Walk along side the park. At the end of Bachelors walk take left and then take right at the roundabout onto Gilford Road. Pass Jet petrol station on left and take next road on the left. Greenmount Vet Clinic is then on the right. From M1 Motorway from Dungannon: Travel along M1 motorway passing Coalisland, Loughgall junctions and take off M1at next junction for Portadown, Craigavon. At motorway roundabout take right for Portadown. Travel straight on this road until you reach Portadown and arrive at a roundabout. Take left at roundabout. At the end of this road keep in left lane at lights and keep left for Banbridge A50 over the bridge over river Bann. At the next small roundabout keep right for Banbridge. At the next roundabout take right onto Gilford Road. Pass Jet petrol station on left and take next road on the left. Greenmount Vet Clinic is then on the right. From Newry & Dundalk. Follow the bypass around Newry. At the B&Q roundabout take the second left for Craigavon/ Portadown/ Tandragee. Travel through Poyntzpass to Tandragee. On the way out of Tandragee on the Portadown road just after the 40 mile speed limit take right onto the Mullahead road signposted for Lurgan. This county road will take you onto the Gilford road of Portadown avoiding the town. At the end of the Mullahead road take left at the roundabout (under construction) and travel into Portadown. The surgery is on the right as you pass through the 30 mile speed limit.. From Monaghan & Armagh. From Armagh take the Portadown road. At the roundabout at the end of the Portadown– Armagh road, take left onto Northway, at the third set of traffic lights turn right into the town. Keep in the left lane going straight through 2 sets of traffic lights and follow the signs for Banbridge A50 over the Bann Bridge. At the next small roundabout keep right for Banbridge. At the next roundabout take right onto Gilford Road. Pass Jet petrol station on left and take next road on the left. Greenmount Vet Clinic is then on the right.. From Banbridge/ A1. Travel through Gilford into Portadown. The surgery is on the Gilford Road on the right as you pass through the 30 mile speed limit

Equine Colic is a distressing condition for both horse and owner, which requires rapid veterinary attention. This is because many of the conditions, which cause colic become life threatening in a relatively short period of time. Colic means pain in the abdomen, and is usually as a result of an intestinal problem, but it can also be caused by internal haemorrhage, uterine pain or urinary dysfunction. Horses do not tend to tolerate abdominal pain very well, and display their discomfort in a very violent and distressing manner. The symptoms to look out for are Pawing at the ground with front feet. Sweating up Repeatedly getting up and lying down Rolling, especially violent rolling Looking at the flanks, or kicking at the belly Tucked up abdomen, grinding the teeth And in severe cases a recumbent horse who is unable to rise. If you observe the above symptoms you should call your equine veterinary surgeon and arrange for him/her to attend as soon as is possible. Until the vet arrives it is useful to slowly walk your horse continuously, as this often helps to settle the pain slightly. More importantly however, it avoids further injury by preventing the self-trauma inflected when violently rolling. If a horses' intestines are distended with gas and air, during colic, rolling may infact lead to displacement of the intestines and the formation of an entrapment or a twist within the loops of intestine. This is a very serious sequel as the blood supply may become obstructed to the intestinal loop and lead to the death of this portion. Without rapid surgical intervention these conditions are unfortunately often fatal. Therefore, where it is safely possible- try to prevent a horse with colic rolling by walking slowly in hand. When the vet arrives he or she will assess 4 main criteria:-

1) Heart rate & rhythm- good indication of how serious the colic is.2) Circulation: a. Hydration b. Pulse strength c. Colour of the gums and capillary refill time 3) Degree of pain/ discomfort 4) Bowels: a. Auscultation with stethoscope e.g.- spasmodic colics-noisy, twisted gut-silent. b. Internal Rectal examination- may give exact diagnosis of type of colic c. Passing a stomach tube- see if increase in stomach pressure or reflux Other information such as the duration of symptoms, bowel movements, worming history and in mares- reproductive history, will be needed. Fortunately, the vast majority (93%) of colic episodes in horses are relatively easily resolved. Most are as a result of SPASMOTIC PAIN or distended loops of intestine with no loss of blood supply. After examination and assessment these are usually treated by an intravenous anti-spasmodic pain relieving injection. The next most common cause is IMPACTION OF THE LARGE INTESTINE by dry hay or straw. These are usually treated by liquid paraffin by stomach tube, to lubricate the intestine and break up the blockage. We advise that you check on the patient regularly over the next few hours to ensure that there is no deterioration and that your horse is now more settled. We often return after 1-2 hours to check that the 4 main criteria are improving. The main decision we, as veterinary surgeons, have to make when examining and assessing a horse with colic is- Does this horse require surgery, or can we treat it medically?

Usually this decision can be reached easily, but not all cases are clear-cut and we may need to re-assess the patients' response to initial treatment 1-2 hours later, to reach a final conclusion. Can we prevent colic? Not all colic types can be prevented, but some management plans can reduce the incidence. A regular worming plan is essential- see worming. Removing manure from paddocks will reduce worm burden. Rotate worming drug types. Make dietary changes gradual, make sure always plenty of water available. Don't feed from the ground on sand or sandy soils- can lead to sand impaction of gut. Make sure your horse is not eating its straw bedding- especially greedy ponies, if they do- change to paper or shavings. Have your horses teeth checked by an equine veterinary surgeon at least one a year as bad dentition will lead to poor digestion of the food and in particular can lead to gut impactions. More on teeth

We are able to offer accurate, rapid diagnosis of many diseases within a few minutes as a result of our on -site laboratory. A Variety of analysers allow us to carry out full blood testing in our on-site laboratory, including Equine fitness profiles Red and White cell counts/ profiles (Haematology) Anaemia & Infections Biochemistry profiles Kidney disease Diabetes mellitus liver disease urine analysis Skin scrapings and Parasitology. This service allows us to quickly assess your horse's condition 24 hours a day, 365 days a year so we may begin the correct treatments immediately without having to wait for postage and external laboratories. When you care for your pet, you obviously want to PROTECT it from disease. Unless properly VACCINATED, your cat is AT RISK of contracting one of these serious infections. Vaccination has been extremely successful in preventing these diseases and is the only way to protect your cat. Feline Leukaemia has become a major cause of infectious death in cats in the UK. The virus gradually destroys the cat's immune defence system, making it more vulnerable to other infections. It is also a major cause of cancer. Feline Leukaemia is being diagnosed more and more commonly throughout Northern Ireland. Over two thirds of cats will come into contact with Feline Leukaemia Virus at some point during their lifetime, and if infected, there is NO treatment available for the virus. Although this respiratory disease of commonly called cat "flu", it is caused by two major viruses: Feline Herpes Virus and Feline Calicivirus. These viruses can produce much a more serious illness in cats than the current UK 'flu produces in people. Cat "flu" is a extremely common illness in unvaccinated cats, and can be fatal in kittens, elderly cats and cats with suppressed immune systems. However most healthy adult cats survive, BUT are UNABLE to eliminate the virus from the body, and have distressing frequent recurrences of the illness- sneezing, runny eyes and nose, conjunctivitis and eye infections, ulcers in the mouth, high temperature. Once a cat is infected there is no treatment to clear the virus and prevent recurrences. The only prevention is to vaccinate before infection occurs. Feline Infectious Enteritis. This is a highly contagious disease causing initial tiredness, high temperature, lack of appetite, then severe vomiting and profuse watery, bloody diarrhoea. This results in rapid and severe dehydration, and frequently death, especially in kittens. Those few cats which do survive often suffer from a variety of other illnesses due to damage to the immune system and their intestines. With Safe and Effective vaccines available at your Veterinary Surgeon, it makes sense to PROTECT your cat as soon as possible. Your cat can be given its FIRST vaccination from 9 weeks old. If your cat is receiving its first vaccination, or its previous vaccinations have been missed, then a second booster vaccination will be given 3-4 weeks later to provide full immunity. BOOSTER VACCINATIONS: Immunity to the diseases above does not last indefinitely and gradually falls, leaving your cat at risk. A booster vaccination given once a year is vital to maintain this immunity, allowing you to PROTECT you cat for the rest of it's life. Furthermore your cat will receive a Full General Health Check Up at each of its annual boosters- essential for early detection of other illness or problems. The flea season is traditionally from Spring to Autumn, however fleas are frequently now an all year round problem in centrally heated houses, with wall- to- wall carpet- A PERFECT BREEDING GROUND throughout the year in your own home! In some pets flea bites cause only irritation and mild scratching, but in others which are allergic to the flea saliva- severe flea allergic dermatitis develops. Prevention is better than Cure. The flea is transmitted between dogs and cats, so it is important to treat all dogs and cats in the household monthly. In some cases it is also necessary to treat the pet's environment directly with a spray to kill the larva and pupae, and prevent eggs hatching. Making your like easier: Difficult to handle pets: A safe effective spot on treatment is available which can be easily applied to the back of the neck in even the most difficult dogs & cats. Safety First: We only supply Flea products which have a very high safety margin in dogs, cats, kittens, puppies and even pregnant and nursing bitches. TICKS: These are blood sucking parasites found especially in woodland or moorland, which can cause abscesses and pass on serious diseases. Effective and Long- lasting: The modern products at Greenmount kill 98-100% of adult fleas within 24 hrs or less, and ticks within 48hrs of attaching. can protect dogs and cats for up to 3 months. more much more effective than flea collars or aerosols. not affected by bathing, swimming or rain. Frequently patients have to be hospitalised at the surgery in order to do further tests or when they require vigorous treatments in severe cases. All our patients are regularly monitored and notes recorded, on their kennels, on our 'in- patient' hospital sheets. Occasionally, it is necessary to isolate some patients in a separate ward when we are concerned about infectious diseases, in order to protect our other in- patients. This is especially common with un-vaccinated pups or dogs infected with parvovirus A VET IS ON CALL FOR EMERGENCIES 24HRS A DAY. Neutering is one of the NCDL's most important campaigns. By neutering your own dog and consequently avoiding unplanned litters of puppies, you will also be helping us to cut down on the numbers of stray dogs on our streets. Did you know? You may be able to qualify for subsidised neutering for just £10 if you are claiming any means tested benefits and live within one of the four dogs trust NCDL campaign regions - North West & North East England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Telephone the clinic to see if you are eligible on 028 38 352640 or 38 358525. Why is neutering so important? Neutering is a guaranteed way of preventing unplanned puppies being born. It is cheaper than the cost of an unplanned canine pregnancy and raising a litter of puppies. Neutering is a safe, effective and humane solution to controlling the dog population on a long-term basis. Each year many thousands of unwanted and abandoned puppies and dogs are needlessly destroyed and we want to put an end to this unnecessary suffering. That's why we believe neutering your dog is the only responsible thing to do. More on neutering found here: Useful facts. A bitch usually comes into season (on heat) twice a year. Each season lasts for about three weeks. With some dogs it can be quite messy and the bitch will need to be kept clean.. When a bitch is in season, she will do anything to escape and follow her instincts. During this time she will need to be kept away from male dogs. Male dogs' behaviour can also alter greatly when a local bitch is in season, again trying to escape at any given opportunity, running across busy roads and even jumping out from high windows. How is it done? Neutering a male dog (castration) is a routine operation performed under general anaesthetic. As well as making a dog less likely to stray it may help problems of aggression in some dogs. Neutering a female dog (spaying) is also a straightforward, although more complicated operation and is performed under general anaesthetic. It is a well-established procedure, but (as with any operation) there is a small risk associated. Recovery time is approximately ten days but will depend on your dog. Your vet will be able to advise you. Dogs will not put on weight following the operation provided they are fed sensibly and exercised regularly. Early neutering can reduce the risk of unwanted pregnancies and some cancers in both male and female dogs. Unneutered bitches can suffer from unwanted pregnancies, false pregnancies, mammary cancers, ovarian cysts, and uterine infections. Road Traffic accidents involving dogs and cats are all too common, and frequently pets require surgery to repair fractured bones, replace dislocated joints and repair/ replace damaged ligaments and tendons. Orthopaedic surgery is also carried out on dogs and cats with joint problems- the most common are: Ruptured Cruciate Ligaments in the knee joint

Osteochrondrosis (sometimes called OCD)- this is a disease which develops during the dog's growth- usually large breeds like labs, boxers and Great danes. At Greenmount, Ewing Walker, one of the Partners, has a special interest in the subject of Small Animal Veterinary Orthopaedics. He has attend at least 7 Post-Graduate Orthopaedic Training Courses over the years to gain proficiency in modern advanced techniques and has gained a wide range of experience in dealing with a wide variety of fractures, bone growth defects, joint trauma and spinal cases with good success rates.Osteochrondrosis of the shoulder joint in a Great Dane. The head of the humerus bone is flattened on x-ray. At surgery a defective flap of cartilage is removed. Otherwise severe arthritis will develop if left untreated. Fractures can be repaired at Greenmount by a variety of methods depending on the fracture type- these include applying a plate and screws across the fracture site, a steel (intramedullary) pin down the middle of the bone from one end to the other, and also external fixators which are like a scaffold structure which support the bone from the outside. In severe cases we can use a combination of 1 or more techniques to make a stronger repair. Nowadays we can repair most fractures in pets by using the techniques described above. Our purpose at Greenmount Veterinary Clinic is to provide the highest quality Veterinary Health Care at a modern, well- equipped Veterinary Clinic. To achieve this we aim to deliver a friendly, professional service which is readily available at the Veterinary Clinic, in the community, and for emergency out- of- hours. Recruit and maintain the highest quality staff. provide training and education for Veterinary Surgeons and Nurses by encouraging continued professional development. .Invest in improved facilities and specialist veterinary equipment. Provide a service which is convenient in terms of opening hours, client visiting of hospitalised patients, equine & small animal call-outs where necessary & easy on-site client parking. Provide a 24 Hour Emergency Service, 365 days-a-year. A vet experienced in Small Animal & Equine Practice is always at the end of the telephone for advice or for emergency call out. Our pets are one of our best friends, yet we often leave them uninsured and the consequences can be expensive. Your dog or cat may suffer an accident, become ill, injure somebody, or cause an accident on the road. Pet insurance plans can cover such eventualities as your pet having an accident, sickness, compensation for having to cancel your holiday, money for advertising or to pay a reward if your pet is lost or stolen. The level of cover varies with each policy, but most provide cover for the following categories: Vet FeesTheft/Straying Advertising/Reward Third Party Liability Accidental Damage. When a pet arrives at the clinic after a road traffic accident or with a broken leg the cost of treatment can be a concern for many people. Having you pet insured removes the question of how much will treatment cost and whether it can be afforded at that time. Other conditions which can become costly to treat over a period of time are what are called CHRONIC diseases- this means that these diseases often last for the lifetime of the pet and many can develop at early ages- e.g. Arthritis, heart disease, skin problems and allergies, cancer, liver or kidney disease. Make sure your insurance covers illnesses and injuries for life. This is invaluable if your pet develops an ongoing condition such as arthritis or eczema, as some policies will stop paying out after the first 12 months. Many people have been very disappointed with these policies.Or alternatively offer a maximum benefit policy which means over the pet's lifetime they will only pay up to a set figure per condition regardless of the cost of treatment. Everyday unidentified pets are humanely destroyed at Dog & Cat Homes throughout Northern Ireland. However, many of these pets could have been saved & re-united with their worried owners if only they had could have been identified. Collars and tags are useful but all too frequently a dog escapes because it has "slipped its collar", or by the time a dog or cat is found it's collar has come off. Identichip- a permanent answer. A tiny Microchip with a unique code can be injected under the skin of your pet. If your pet is lost and picked up, a special scanner can detect the identichip and read the code. These scanners are routinely used by rescue kennels, dog wardens, veterinary surgeons, USCPA, Cat Protection League, and Welfare societies, all over the country. Once a chip is detected and read, the Central Database, which is open 24 hours a day, is contacted and your details come up, allowing you to be contacted immediately. All pets of any age, breed or species can be "identichipped", from, dogs & cats to horses & budgerigars. The Author of this Website, one of the veterinary surgeons at Greenmount Vet Clinic, would be lost without his pets, and has his 3 dogs and horse all identichipped. Is it worth the risk? For more advice, or to have your pet microchipped, please contact the surgery now. Not only will neutering prevent unwanted pregnancy, it can help protect your pet from serious disease and cancer. These are 5 good reasons to consider neutering:: 1. Cancer Female dogs, which are spayed before their first or second heat season have a significantly reduced risk of developing cancer of the mammary glands. Mammary carcinoma is a very serious form of cancer, which can rapidly spread to other parts of the body, which make a complete cure almost impossible, unless diagnosed very early. Therefore if we can help reduce the risk of this life threatening disease, we should consider it. Castration of male dogs eliminates the risk of testicular cancer & reduces greatly the risk of prostate cancer. Pyometra (Infection of the womb). Female dogs and cats frequently develop serious infections of the uterus or "womb" after finishing their heat season, whether they have been mated or not. Often the infection can develop into a "pyometra", which requires a hysterectomy to remove the infection. This disease is frequently seen in older pets which then require an operation, which is more complicated than a routine spay, when they are both older and ill. These factors obviously increase surgical and anaesthetic risks ( & costs). Its makes sense not to take the risk and have your pet spayed when it is young and healthy. 3. Spraying Tom cats. Male unneutered tomcats will begin spraying urine to mark or "scent" their territory soon after 6 months old. As they mature and become sexually active, the urine develops a very unpleasant smell. This very unpleasant characteristic of the male cat can usually be prevented by neutering at 5-6 months old. If left too late, the behaviour is frequently not reversible. 4. Aggressive dogs/ Dominance. Aggressive or dominant tendencies in male dogs can frequently be reduced or prevented by having male dogs neutered at 5-6 months old. As with spraying Tomcats, if left too late the behaviour is often not reversible. 5. Unwanted pregnancies. An obvious, and very important, reason for neutering is to prevent unwanted pregnancy, also straying of male dogs and the inconvenience of a cat or bitch being in heat. Numerous unwanted puppies and kittens are born each year. Many are abandoned or die from disease or starvation. Those which cannot be rehomed have to be humanely destroyed. Help prevent this unnecessary suffering by having your pet neutered. Perhaps, now is not the time to suggest that vaccination could have prevented your pets death or illness. The death of a much-loved family pet is distressing under any circumstances, but even more so when the death is sudden and could perhaps have been prevented. With a single injection you are able to PROTECT your pet from several potentially FATAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES. Click on the appropriate link below to learn more about how you can protect your dog, cat or rabbit. Over the last few months we have seen an increase in the number of cases of Myxomatosis, both in pet and wild rabbits, around Portadown. A lot of people don't consider that wild rabbits can gain access to their gardens especially if you live near the parks, in the leafy areas of town or in the country, and hence spread the disease. Myxomatosis is caused by a pox virus which originated from South America. The virus can be spread by direct contact between rabbits, but most often by rabbit fleas and the virus can survive for several months in over wintering rabbit fleas! In an attempt to reduce rabbit numbers the myxoma virus was intentionally introduced to Australia. By accident the virus was also introduced into Europe decimating the wild rabbit population. Symptoms This is a horrible disease usually causing 100% death/ mortality after suffering for on average 13 days with widespread skin sores especially on the head and the eyelids which results in blindness. There are other forms of Myxomatosis that result in respiratory symptoms that can be very difficult to differentiate from other causes of pneumonia such as pasturellae. Treatment Unfortunately treatment of rabbits suffering with the acute form of the disease is disappointing. Even with excellent nursing from an attentive owner who manages to keep the affected rabbit eating and drinking they often die of breathing complications after 2 weeks. Thus we find that it is more humane to euthanase them once the diagnosis of acute Myxomatosis has been made. Control If you have had a case of myxomatosis, in order to control the spread it is important to do three things. Disinfect the area where the affected rabbit was to kill the virus. Control rabbit fleas that can spread the virus. Vaccinate the remaining rabbits immediately. The use of the cat flea control product Advantage® can be useful in controlling rabbit fleas. Prevention. As there is no effective treatment, prevention by vaccination is the best policy. We recommend vaccination of all rabbits, which have any access to outdoors.The vaccine we use can be given to rabbits as young as 6 weeks old and produces immunity 14d after vaccination. Normally rabbits are booster vaccinated annually but where there is a high risk of Myxomatosis infection we advise revaccination every 6 months. Endoscopy, or "scoping" is an excellent means of investigating diseases involving: The Respiratory Tract The Stomach The Bowel. It provides a safe, non-invasive method for examining these difficult-to-see places without the need for surgery. With the pet sedated or under a General Anaesthetic the fibre- optic endoscope is carefully passed allowing the vet to see into the respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts through a lens rather like a camera. All our patients are given a full clinical examination before they are receive any form of anaesthetic and before they undergo a surgical procedure. We recognise, as do you, that surgery and anaesthesia are not without risks but we constantly strive to keep these risks to a minimum. We offer older or high risk patients a pre- anaesthetic blood test in our in- house laboratory to identify potential liver or kidney disease, enabling us to chose the most appropriate and safest anaesthetic. We are able to provide small animal anaesthesia by an oxygen/ isoflurane gaseous mixture which is currently recognised as the safest anaesthetic method available to Veterinary Practice. All small animal patients are constantly monitored during surgery and anaesthesia. Ultrasound scanning is very useful for looking at the tissues and organs of the body. It is particularly excellent for visualising fluid within the body. It is a very safe technique even during pregnancy to visualise: The Bladder for bladder stones or tumours, The Uterus for pregnancy or infections, The Liver, Spleen and kidneys for tumours or disease, The Heart muscle to assess contraction and thickness-The most common indication for ultrasoundography in equine practice is in the per rectal examination of the ovaries and uterus during fertility examinations. Another common use of Ultrasound is for scanning of tendons to assess damage to the tendon fibers and monitor their healing allowing a prediction of when to return the horse to work Click here to go to Tendon Scanning. Ultrasound scanning however has many uses other than these common ones- we find it very helpful in assessing bladder problems in foals, and also when ultrasounding the chest in foals for abscesses in Rhodococcus equi - a severe form of foal pneumonia especially seen during summer in foals returning from or when at stud. Cancer (Tumours, Neoplasia or "growths") are unfortunately very common in animals, as well as in people. As a result, a lot is known about cancer in animals as a result of human cancer research. Many tumours can be easily removed surgically without any spread or risk of them re-growing. However more aggressive forms of cancer cannot be completely cleared from the body by surgery alone. Female dogs, which are neutered (spayed) before their first or second heat season have a significantly reduced risk of developing cancer of the mammary glands. Castration of male dogs eliminates the risk of testicular cancer & reduces greatly the risk of prostate cancer. Veterinary Cancer Therapy has advanced dramatically over the last number of years both in terms of the surgical and diagnostic techniques available, but importantly in the area of Chemotherapy. Many of us will know a person or maybe a pet which has received life saving chemotherapy. We at the Greenmount Veterinary Clinic, are pet owners and lovers ourselves, and our primary objective is to Relieve Suffering and provide our patients with a Good Quality of Life for as long as possible. We believe that Quality of life is more important than merely duration. With this in mind the Cancer Chemotherapy we offer is used at dosages which does not cause noticeable side-effects in our patients. At these doses we have enabled many pets to be able to live normal good quality lives for many months more than would otherwise have been expected. The most common type of cancer we use chemotherapy in is lymphoma or lymphosarcoma. Unfortunately however, as in human medicine, there are many other types of tumours/ cancer which do not respond well to chemotherapy. The heart of a dog or cat is very similar to our own, and although our pets don't suffer from cholesterol related heart and blood vessel problems, they can develop other difficulties which are very similar to human heart disease. However many treatments are available, which have made great improvements to the quality of our pets lives. One of the Partners, Neil Walmsley, takes a particular interest in cardiology (heart disease) and has attended many post graduate courses on this subject. Radiology (X-ray) of the chest & heart will determine heart size, deviation of the trachea, and whether pulmonary oedema or fluid is present within the lungs- these both cause the symptoms of coughing which is frequently associated with heart disease. E.C.G. (Electrocardiogram) In order to diagnose defects in the heart rhythm an Electrocardiogram or ECG is essential. We have recently purchased a new ECG machine which is particularly important when dealing with some irregular heart rhythms which are potentially life-threatening and must be diagnosed and treated rapidly. Atrial fibrillation is a relatively common arrhythmia in dogs with cardiac disease. Ultrasound scanning of the heart on "M-mode" is also a valuable procedure which is performed at the Vet Clinic. This provides us with an assessment of the thickness of the heart muscle wall and how well the muscle is beating. This is of particular assistance in diseases of cardiac muscle - the cardiomyopathies. Where necessary referral can be arranged for full colour flow doppler ultrasound.. At Greenmount Veterinary Clinic we will examine your pets teeth and gums and make recommendations for treatments, either at the surgery or at home. If your pet already has evidence of periodontal disease, a professional cleaning at the surgery is required: Professional Dental Treatments: After a full clinical examination your pet will require a General anaesthetic, see section on anaesthesia. Once your pet is under anaesthesia, accumulated tartar and calculus is removed by Ultrasonic Descaling. Any teeth which are severely diseased can be extracted. Finally the teeth are polished to slow down formation of new plaque, tartar, and calculus. Good Dental Care at Home: For cats and dogs, regular brushing is an important part of any preventive dental program. A special toothbrush and toothpaste for pets are recommended. Chlorhexidine mouth washes for cats can also help control plaque decreasing eventual odour. We can show you the proper way to brush your pet's teeth. Feeding your pet coarse-textured dry food may help prevent accumulation of plaque, tartar, and calculus. Advice is available as to the best diet for your pet. For more on Small Animal Veterinary Dentistry click here. We advise that you return to your Veterinary Surgeon for regular dental check- ups every 6 to 18 months. We offer FREE dental examinations please ring to make an appointment. The majority of dogs and cats that are over 4 years old have a condition in which bacteria attack the soft gum tissues of the mouth. This condition is called periodontal disease. Periodontal disease begins with the development of plaque on your pet's teeth. Plaque is a substance that forms when bacteria multiply on the teeth and gums. Plaque mixes with saliva, hardens, and becomes the substances known as tartar and calculus. Bacteria, plaque, tartar, and calculus irritate the gums, which become tender, red, and swollen. This stage of dental disease is called gingivitis. Eventually inflamed gums separate from the teeth, creating pockets that can trap more bacteria. These pockets deepen and bacteria may attack the roots of the teeth and the bony tissue of the jaw, causing teeth to loosen, the gums to bleed, mouth odour, and pain when your pet eats. We are able to offer accurate, rapid diagnosis of many diseases within a few minutes as a result of our on -site laboratory . A Variety of analysers allow us to carry out full blood testing in our on-site laboratory, including Pre- Anaesthetic Blood Testing Red and White cell counts/ profiles (Haematology) Anaemia & Infections Biochemistry profiles Kidney disease Diabetes mellitus Liver disease Also carried out are: Urine analysis Skin scrapings and Parasitology. This service allows us to quickly assess your pets condition 24 hours a day, 365 days a year so we may begin the correct treatments immediately without having to wait for postage and external laboratories. Tests can be easily repeated to monitor your pets progress. Hip score X-rays are taken at the clinic under general anaesthetic in dogs over 1 year old. These are sent for independent scrutiny by a panel at The Kennel Club/ British Veterinary Association. This is to encourage breeding from adult dogs with good hip conformation to reduce the prevalence of hip dysplasia in particular in large dog breeds like labs, Rotties, and German Shepherd Dogs.

Our cost for Canine Hip Score is £75- This includes the general anaesthetic, taking of the x-rays and the BVA/KC fee. Careful positioning of the dog by an experienced veterinary surgeon whilst taking the x-rays if essential in order to achieve a low (good) hip score. Our experience in taking hip score x-rays and good value means that we receive dogs from German Shepherd Dog Breeders from all over the country.(A Stamp also carried out). Myleography.- see spinal surgery Myelograms are a specialist x- ray technique which can be carried out at the clinic. They are used to locate the site of spinal cord compression. This dog "Lucky" had 3 sites of spinal cord compression (at arrow heads) due to the prolapse of 3 seperate discs in his neck. The cord compression at the middle arrow was causing paralysis of his limbs so he was unable to walk. He made a good recovery following surgery when we operated on the 3 sites during one operation. Myelography is performed under general anaesthesia- this involves carefully injecting a clear sterile solution into the space along side the spinal cord. This solution runs by gravity along the spinal cord and stops or deviates at the site of the problem, allowing us to know where exactly to surgically relieve the compression on the spinal cord. Spinal Surgery is a specialist part of orthopaedics which is performed at the practice. It involves delicate surgery to the main nerve which carries all the information from the brain to the legs, bladder etc- called the spinal cord.

The spinal cord is encased for its protection in a bony canal- the spinal column or spine- from when it leaves the brain at the back of the skull, passes down the neck & back until it reaches below the pelvis. The spinal nerves exit out of the spinal cord at each bone (vertebral) joint along the spine- these nerves supply the instructions from the brain to the muscle of the body (e.g. for walking), and also conduct information from the body back to the brain (e.g. pain, heat sensation in the toes) a little like a computer cable. So you can see any disruption in the nerves ability to conduct will have major consequences- the most common reason the nerves stop functioning is because something is pressing on them and causing compression-- for example- disc prolapse, spinal cord swelling, tumour, fractures of the spine, and growth/ developmental defects. The symptoms: These include back pain in most cases, difficulty walking, to poor balance, through to total paralysis and no feeling in the legs. Myleography. In order to locate the site of spinal cord compression we perform a specialist x-ray technique called myelography which is carried out under general anaesthesia- this involves carefully injecting a clear sterile solution into the space along side the spinal cord. This solution runs by gravity along the spinal cord and stops or deviates at the site of the problem, allowing us to know where exactly to surgically relieve the compression on the spinal cord. This dog "Lucky" had 3 sites of spinal cord compression (at arrow heads) due to the prolapse of 3 seperate discs in his neck. The cord compression at the middle arrow was causing paralysis of his limbs so he was unable to walk. He made a good recovery following surgery when we operated on the 3 sites during one operation. The Operation: Because the spinal cord is encased in bone we have to use specialist equipment to burr a window through the spinal bone to reach the compressed portion of cord without damaging the cord itself which lies immediately below the inner surface of the bone. The cord is inspected and any material pressing on it is removed. Most cases make good improvement after surgery provided the cord has not be severed during a road traffic accident or permanently damaged by severe pressure. Surgery however MUST be carried out quickly if the dog or cat is paralysed, if a return to walking again is to be expected. Due to the specialist nature of this surgery and the expense of the equipment required, spinal surgery is expensive, and is again why we recommend pet health insurance for these unexpected events. nternal parasites are silent killers. They can cause extensive internal damage, and you may not even realise your animals are heavily infected. At the very least, parasites can lower resistance, rob the horse of valuable nutrients, and cause gastrointestinal irritation and unthriftiness. At their worst, they can lead to colic, intestinal ruptures, and death. There are more than 150 internal parasites that afflict horses, including several major species. Among the most common and troublesome are: Large strongyles (bloodworms) Small strongyles Ascarids (roundworms) Pinworms Bots Tapeworms Threadworms Lungworms. Any or all of these parasites can be present in the horse at one time, but they may be at different stages in their life cycles. This will influence the deworming program needed to combat them. Also, keep in mind that some species can lay more than 200,000 eggs a day, so parasite loads can escalate quickly. A COMPLETE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Importantly, chemical control is just one part of a total parasite control plan. Since parasites are primarily transferred through manure, good management is also key. You should: Pick up and dispose of manure droppings on a regular basis (at least twice weekly) Mow and harrow pastures regularly to break up manure piles and expose parasite eggs and larvae to the elements Rotate pastures by allowing other livestock, such as sheep or cattle, to graze them, thereby interrupting the life cycles of equine parasites Group horses by age to reduce exposure to certain parasites and maximize the deworming program geared to that group Keep the number of horses per acre to a minimum to prevent overgrazing and reduce the fecal contamination per acre Use a feeder for hay and grain rather than feeding on the ground Rotate deworming agents, not just brand names, to prevent chemical resistance Consult your vet to set up an effective and regular deworming schedule. It is essential to frequently worm young puppies and kittens, because they are most at risk of severe disease. 2. Toxocara canis, is easily transmitted to children, and can cause permanent eye damage and loss of sight. For this , if for no other reason, we all have a responsibility to keep our animals free from worms, and minimise the spread of infection in the environment. Both dogs and cats require regular worming, with a product which kills all tapeworms and all roundworms. Fortunately, we can provide a treatment which kills all intestinal worms which commonly infect UK dogs and cats, with a single, simple dose. We recommend treatment for worms every 3 months, in adult dogs and cats, more frequently in puppies and kittens. In- House Stocks for the safe restraint of mares and foals enable us to carry out Ultrasound Scanning for Pregnancy and Fertility Treatments on site. The timing of ovulation can be assessed accurately which is critical to increase fertility rates for natural covering by the stallion, or when we are performing Artificial Insemination. X-ray ,Tendon Scanning or Endoscopy can also be performed on site or at the clients premises with our portable equipment. On site Equine Laboratory permits rapid results for full Biochemistry and Haematology blood testing for foals and adult horses. In field General Anaesthesia of horses is carried routinely for surgery such as hernia operations and castration of stallions with retained testes i.e. "rigs". A full Equine Dental Service is provided for rasping (floating) of teeth, extraction of wolf teeth and treatment of dental disease. A 24 Hour Emergency Call-Out Service is provided 365 days per year to deal with urgent cases such as colics, sick foals and horses, foalings and injuries. A vet experienced in equine practice is always at the end of the telephone when needed.  



The websites www.vetclinic.co.uk, www.vetclinic.ie, www.smallanimalclinic.co.uk, www.equineclinic.co.uk, www.vetortho.ie and www.vetortho.co.uk are owned, registered and produced by Ewing G. Walker of Greenmount Veterinary Clinic

Thanks to http://www.flickr.com/photos/ambertq/2964284501/  dog beach photo; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Welcome to Greenmount vets Portadown- dog, cat & pet vets in Portadown Co Armagh Northern Ireland

GREENMOUNT
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Where your pets come first


• Friendly knowledgeable and helpful staff


• Experienced surgeons qualified with the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons


• Dedicated, caring & Qualified nursing staff


• Convenient opening hours- open 8.30am-8pm, 3 clinics per day


• Competitively priced


• Established over 50 years (est. 1951)


• On site extensive surgical, diagnostic, and medical treatment facilities including the latest digital xray systems


• Free off road parking


• Dog and cat grooming Portadown- onsite pet groomer


• 24 hour emergency service 365 days a year provided on site to our clients


• Free nurse consultations for dental checks, weight and diet advice


• On site orthopaedic referral service for complex fracture repair, spinal surgery & advanced joint surgery including hip replacement and key hole arthroscopy


• Members of the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA)


• Continuity of care- ask to see the same vet or nurse each time you visit, or see the vet most familiar with your pet’s needs


“A practice you would recommend to your friends”- see testimonials·



Why don’t you call in and see us and introduce your pet to our nursing team-

Referral, Greenmount, Veterinary, vet, disc, disease, prolpase, Orthopaedic, orthopedic, clinic, fractures, joint, surgery, arthroscopy, endoscopy, spinal, northern, ireland, OCD, FCP, TPO, cruciate ligament, tplo, hip, dysplasia, dislocation, medial, patellar, luxation, broken, leg, wobbler, caudal cervical spondylopathy, lumbar, paralysis,ACL, anterior cruciate ligament rupture, dislocated, dislocation, plating, pinning, external fixator, triple pelvic osteotomy, portadown, co armagh northern ireland, www.vetortho.co.uk, www.vetclinic.co.uk
Why choose greenmount vets Portadown ? - what makes us different ?
At Greenmount vets Portadown we are proud of our nursing team – for them, its not just a job, it’s more of a vocation – not only have they qualifications- but they are genuinely devoted to ensuring your pets receive TLC, are comfortable, clean and well cared for. In doing so they make a huge impact to the quality of care and recovery of our patients.
portadown-vet-contact us

Greenmount Veterinary Clinics specialise in small animal practice and are based in Portadown & Richhill, Co Armagh, Northern Ireland. This allows us to focus our energy and time on this area of practice in order to provide a more focused service in terms of training, facilities and equipment available.

This website is divided into areas of Small animals (dogs, cats & pets) and orthopaedic and ophthalmology referrals. Information is available on medical and surgical facilities and also preventative healthcare.

Please take time to navigate around the site using the links at the top of each page.



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028 38 358525
rcvs practice standards

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